The High Calling of Motherhood with Chimene Dupler

 

 

Ep 9 | The High Calling of Motherhood with Chimene Dupler

Listen on Apple Podcasts

We sit down with author, speaker, and Trinity parent Chimene Dupler as she encourages mothers in the trenches of parenting to rely on the strength of the Lord. Chimene shares candidly about lessons learned while raising her three daughters, and strives to equip parents with confidence to raise up the next generation. She also gives a sneak peek of her next book!

Mothers have the opportunity to impact the next generation...we have the opportunity to raise

a generation of world changers. 

     

Chimene Dupler

Chimene Shipley Dupler, author of The High Calling of Motherhood, is a well-respected speaker and author on marriage and parenting. Chimene is the founder of Passion4Moms ministry, a non-profit ministry for mothers that she ran for 10 years that impacted thousands of women around the world. Chimene has been featured on the radio at WGTS as well as a contributor at Focus on the Family and TODAY Parenting. She loves the opportunity to help others achieve their goals and work through struggles to make their marriages, parenting, and life experiences fun and fabulous by providing practical tools for success. Chimene is most passionate about seeing others walk in the confidence of Who and Whose they are in Christ, and raise up a generation of World Changers.

Previously, Chimene worked on Capitol Hill in the United States Senate and with foster homes and residential treatment centers as a social worker. Chimene graduated from Baylor University with a B.S. in Child and Family Studies. 

Chimene is most proud to be living out her passion for marriage and parenting daily, endeavoring to bring God glory as a wife and mother and living life to the fullest. Chimene and her husband, Todd, have three princesses. Reagan and Jordan are graduates of Trinity Christian School both attending Baylor University, and Riley is a junior at Trinity. Chimene’s greatest passion in life—being a mother! 

Jo Wilbur

Jo Wilbur is a Marketing and Communications Specialist at Trinity Christian School and proud JMU grad who loves writing, shopping, and making new friends. She and her husband live in Paeonian Springs and spend time together cooking plant-based meals, singing worship songs, and volunteering as Young Life leaders in their community.

Book: The High Calling of Motherhood available on Amazon                       Follow Chimene on Instagram & Facebook:
                                                                                                                                  @chimeneshipleydupler
                                                                                                                                  @thewashingtondcmom (family ideas/activities in the DMV)

Ultimately we need to be parenting through the perspective of eternity...when we open our eyes and start to see our relationships, our parenting, our marriages, our culture from an eternal perspective, it will shift how we see the world.

 

 


 

Transcript

 

Disclaimer: This is a direct transcript of the podcast audio and may not be grammatically correct.

 


Jo Wilbur:

Hello, and welcome to “Mind and Heart,” a podcast by Trinity Christian School. I'm your host, Jo Wilbur, and today I'm sitting down with Trinity Christian School parent, author, speaker, and mother of three, Chimene Dupler. Thank you for joining us today, Chimene.

Chimene Dupler:
Thank you for having me.

Jo Wilbur:
Absolutely. So, tell us, what have you been up to these days? Maybe share with those of our listeners who don't know you a little bit about your background and yeah, what your day-to-day life is looking like.

Chimene Dupler:
Awesome, well, thank you very much for this opportunity to share. My background, I studied Child and Family Studies at Baylor University in Texas. Whenever I first moved to DC 25 years ago, worked on Capitol Hill, worked at Family Research Council, and then when my oldest daughter Reagan was born, I quit working on the Hill and stayed at home with her. And as we had our other children, Jordan and Riley, a few years into parenting, I wanted to start a ministry for moms, mainly because I just saw such a need for it, and I think we're going to dive into that a little bit later. But I started a nonprofit ministry Passion for Moms and ran that for ten years. Recently have just closed that down. And so now I am, in a lot of ways, just back to being a full-time mom. You think that as life changes and as your kids get older, maybe things slow down, but many times life continues to be very busy as you're navigating a lot of those transitions. I am also working on another book. I wrote a book five years ago, “The High Calling of Motherhood,” and I'm working on another book at this time a little bit more just behind the scenes. So, it's not, you know, something that I'm out talking a lot about as I'm writing it. But yeah.

Jo Wilbur:
But I do want to ask you, that's a perfect segue about the book that you wrote. “The High Calling of Motherhood” was published in 2017, I believe. Can you tell us in a nutshell what that book is about and what inspired you to write?

Chimene Dupler:
Yes. So, the book turns five next month in May, right around Mother's Day. And really just a heart for the family, a heart for the opportunity for moms to see the value that they have to offer not only in their individual families, but in culture, and recognizing just how impactful the blessing of being a mom is. And so, it's written really out of wanting to encourage moms. So often, culturally speaking, moms can refer to themselves, whenever you say, “what do you do?” You know, so often people are looking for “What is that career?” “What are you how are you spending your time?” And I would hear moms say, “Well, I'm just a mom,” and I don't want anyone to ever say “I'm just a mom.” You can be working full time and be a mom. You can be a stay-at-home mom. But you're never just a mom because being a mom is such a high calling, in my opinion, because it's a holy calling. You know, God opens and closes the womb and talks about in Psalms that children are a gift from the Lord, a heritage. And if God is giving us a gift, that is a holy gift, and we should look at that holy gift with intentionality and with purpose and with reverence of just looking at the opportunities that God has chosen me to invest in the lives of these three blessings that He has given me. And so just to kind of help change the perspective and narrative about how women see and even men and women see the role of motherhood.

Jo Wilbur:
I love that because you're right. I do think in society there is that “I'm just a mom,” or, you know, “It's what I do on the side, you know, while I'm thinking about what I want to do for my career.” But I love that you describe it as it's a calling because when we hear that word a “calling,” it's like you have this great purpose, this job to do.

Chimene Dupler:
Yeah, you have a purpose. You have an intentionality in how you go about parenting. And so, one of the things that, in encouraging women to see their role as mothers as a holy and a high calling, it also changes the narrative about how we spend our day. And so, we're very intentional in how we map out our day. We're not just getting through the day to get through dinner, to do bath time and put them to bed. But instead, we're very intentional on when we wake up in the morning about how we are reaching their hearts for Jesus throughout the day. And so, changing just how we view and are more calculated in our role and how we spend our day-to-day and the activities that we choose to do or not do with our kids.

Jo Wilbur:
Yeah, yeah. I love that. It's like understanding what motherhood really is and that it is a high calling actually affects the way that you parent. It changes the way that you are as a mother. I love that concept. Why or what would you say is the most important role of a mother? Maybe that's a strange way to ask that question, but when you think of being a mother, what do you think is sort of the number one thing that that requires.

Chimene Dupler:
Without question, reaching their hearts for Jesus. Absolutely. And so, as believers in Jesus then, my number one goal is to point my children to Jesus. My number one goal is to help them understand their need for Christ, which, again, is very countercultural. We live in a society right now very heightened with wanting our kids’ self-esteem to be amazing and all about them, and everybody gets a trophy, and no one wants to take inventory of our need. And yet we are born sinners, our children are born sinners. And so, we need to recognize that our job as parents is to point our children to Jesus. Our job as parents is to help our kids understand their need for Christ. And so, my job with my girls from day one has been in everything, pointing them to Jesus, you know, when they're toddlers and they're throwing a tantrum or not wanting to obey, teaching them that, you know, “children, obey your parents and the Lord for this is right.” And so, helping them understand why we obey when they're being selfish or not wanting to share, teaching them how Jesus calls us to share. And so, a lot of times, practically speaking, especially when my kids were younger, always having a Bible verse associated with whatever concept I was teaching. And so that can be something, you know, we joke a lot about it and maybe as parents about, you know, kids complaining. But there's a great verse, "Do everything without grumbling or complaining." And so always having the Word of God as our manual and as our tool book, as our guide in how we're navigating their hearts to him. And so, then as we are pointing out their need for Christ, we're using God's word in everything that we're doing to point them to Jesus and their need for a savior.

Jo Wilbur:
You know, it is amazing because what you're describing essentially is a ministry, right? You're a full-time minister. When you're a mom, you're ministering to your kids. And as an adult woman, looking back on my childhood, I mean, there are things that, to this day, when I'm faced with something, I'll have my mom's voice in my head of something that she used to tell me when I was a little girl, you know, or Bible verses that she used to throw out at us. So, it's just cool to think that when you're a mom, you'll be that voice for them when they're, you know, grown up and when they're out on their own. It's just… it's a cool opportunity. As a mom, you can uniquely speak into their lives in a way that nobody else can.

Chimene Dupler:
Absolutely. And a lot of times those building blocks early on is where the foundation is laid. You think about a house being built, and if you do not have a firm foundation… this is a parable in the Bible, right? The storms of life come, a house not built on a firm foundation, the winds come the winds blow and blow the house down. But a firm foundation stands and weathers the storms. And so exactly what you're saying is when our children are young, as we are sowing seed of the word of God into their lives, that becomes the foundation for how they navigate life. And so that becomes if their hearts are built firmly and rooted on Jesus and that their identity is found in Christ, that they understand who and whose they are in Him. Then as they begin to go into later in elementary school and middle school, high school, college, their foundation is built and rooted on the Word of God. And so how they see life, how they interact with society is framed, like you're saying, from what you have been taught. Right? What your mom is teaching you. And I love how you put it, that being a mom is ministry, a family is ministry. And so, when we look at family and motherhood as ministry, oftentimes culture looks at being a mom as a burden. Oh, I have to do this. No, you have been given that the biggest blessing of your life. God has entrusted these beautiful children to you to impact and to point them to Jesus, but then also for them to go out and impact the world for Jesus, right?

Jo Wilbur:
Wow. Well, even as you're saying that, gosh, I think you're ministering to me because even, you know, young women who are considering “should I have children even?” I think you're right. The way that society talks about having children, it makes us scared. It sounds hard, it's scary. I don't know what I'm doing. I'm going to mess up.

Chimene Dupler:
Let me just set you free from that. That is a lie from the enemy. And that is not of God. And such an opportunity also of just... so one, how we view motherhood, how we view family. But you know, when Jesus gave the Great Commission, he said to go into all the world first to Judea, then to Samaria, and then to the other most parts of the world. Our home is Judea. We have to start at home and then we can go out. And so, one of the ways, practically speaking, that I would look at our home, we have a family of five, my husband, myself and our three princesses. And, you know, as they all came to know the Lord, right? They came to know the Lord at early ages. It was like every time we were going out and leaving our home, we were on mission field. Right? And so, when we look at raising up world changers in our home, when we look at our home as a discipleship opportunity, then we have the opportunity to then when we leave our house, it's like five missionaries are leaving their house every day. To go do ministry. Another great opportunity as a mom is, you know, as we point our children to Christ, we're raising up disciples in our own home. And so, you know, to share the Gospel with your children, it's like you have your converts right there in your house and to be able to pray with them, to ask Jesus into their heart and their lives. And so just looking at the whole concept of family as ministry and discipleship and that we are fulfilling the Great Commission when we go out every day as a family.

Jo Wilbur:
That is so powerful. I love that. So, something that I hear a lot, often when referring to motherhood or parenthood, is this sort of familiar adage “You pick your battles,” you know, I've heard that a lot, “You pick your battles. I'll give them this one.” What is something, I would love your take on this, that maybe as a mom you choose to pick that battle or is worth fighting for when it comes to your girls that you've learned.

Chimene Dupler:
Yeah, I will say this, I understand the statement and the adages and culture. I don't know that I always agree with it. Meaning you pick the battle to fight for their heart and that is in a lot of areas. Right? That's in what they're intaking with their eyes, what they're intaking with their ears. That's the kind of friendships and relationships that they have. You fight for their heart. And what I mean by that is if we are so intentional that we are pointing our children to Jesus and we are intentional in wanting to shape and mold them into the image of Christ, you know, we as believers, we are the bride of Christ, and we need to be pure and blameless before him, holy. And so, fighting for the heart is going to be carried out in a lot of different ways. That's the reason I have a little bit of a problem of “Pick your battles.” I understand the point and especially as your kids get older. So, I've had two that have graduated from high school and two that are in college now. One of the things that we were intentional in doing even by the time of their senior year, and let me explain this, but we essentially told them, you know, they have no rules in the house. What I mean by that: it wasn't a free for all and it didn't really mean that there were no rules. But what we wanted to establish was a year of transition where we were not, you know, you're not micromanaging a 16, 17, 18-year-old the way you are a two-, three-, four-, five-year-old. Right? And they would ask us, you know, “Can we watch this?” or “could we go to this place?” And well, what do you think? And maybe sometimes they don't always make the best choices, or you have situations that come around that become teaching opportunities because you've helped have that year of transition before them just going off to college, you have that transition year of walking through life with them. So, whenever I hear “Pick your battles,” I think of that less in the early years and more in the later years personally. Because you're in the war zone when your kids are little. Meaning you should be very intentional, 24/7. You are in the trenches of war and as you have built again that foundation, you've laid the foundation so that then by the time they're in middle school, high school, what picking your battles looks like is a little bit different because you're helping navigate and talk through life. You're talking through friendships, you're talking through consequences. You're talking through things that look differently versus when they're really little. You know, people get into picking, “Oh, I'm not going to fight with them about what they should wear or what they should eat.” Well, quite frankly, you're the parent. Be the parent.

Jo Wilbur:
Yeah. Yeah. Well, I love that. And you start, you know, as they get older, you're right. Starting to have them bear the weight of a little bit of that responsibility to say, “Well, do you think that's right? You know, you know this. You know- you have a conscience,” right?

Chimene Dupler:
Right. And if your children have asked Jesus into their lives, they have the Holy Spirit in their lives. And so, they are not only having you as a voice in their ear, they have a personal relationship with Jesus, and the Holy Spirit is holding them and calling them to account as well.

Jo Wilbur:
Which is a perfect segue way into my next question, which, you know, on this podcast we are all about preparing the next generation to be the salt and light in the world. I mean, do you have other...you've already given us so many practical tips on this, and especially as they transition to getting ready to leave the house and go out into the world. Do you have other tips or ideas for, you know, how can you instill them with those things and ensure that as they leave the home they will be salt and light in the world?

Chimene Dupler:
Yeah, a couple of things come to mind. One thing is, have a game plan. And what I mean by that is you talked about just a moment ago, about as a young couple, you can be thinking like, “should I have kids?” And so often people go into parenthood without a game plan. And so, it's wonderful to like, “Oh, I'm pregnant,” and you bring home the baby, and you get all the baby stuff, and you just start kind of going through life, and life gets busy, and then you get busy in all the ballet and T-ball and sports, and you're just running from one thing to another. And then you show up at graduation, your kids are leaving, and then you look back and are you going to have regrets about how you spent your time? Now, I'm a person who, yes, I have regrets in that I have not handled every situation well. I've made plenty of mistakes as a parent. But I have been intentional to try my best to live life as best in my power with as little regrets as possible. Meaning I wanted to be so intentional in how I parented that when graduation day came, I had done my work. Now it doesn't mean I did it perfectly. Please don't hear me say that. But it did mean that from day one, being intentional of knowing where I wanted to end up come May of their senior year. And Satan's subtle, right? Distraction robs us of opportunity. And so, when we are so busy that we are not intentional in how we're spending our time. You know, the Bible talks about “Teach us to number our days wisely,” right? “That we may gain a heart of wisdom.” And so, we need to be thoughtful in where we're wanting to end up so that when graduation day is upon us, that we're not like, “Oh, wait, I didn't do this.” Well, you know, by that point they're ready to leave. And you're, you know, you're trying to stuff the genie back in the bottle, so to speak. And so, a couple of practical ways of doing that is, first of all, just knowing where you're wanting to end up. And so, for me personally, really wanting to point my children to Jesus, wanting them to have a personal relationship with Jesus and wanting them to spend time with Jesus every day without me was a foundational point that I wanted them to own by the time that they're graduating from high school.

Jo Wilbur:
So that's the end goal.

Chimene Dupler:
Right! So that their relationship is personal before they leave for college. One of the practical ways, and this can start super early, is getting on the same page with your husband. In the business world, we're so good about having quarterly meetings, we create goals, we know what our mission statement is. We know what the purpose of a company is all about. Right? And whether you have board meetings or you have quarterly meetings, you are constantly evaluating. Are you fulfilling the mission of the company? The same should be true in parenting and family. So, we took those very practically. When our kids were really young we would get a babysitter and we would just go to coffee, and we would talk through each girl and what we were working on, what was working, what wasn't working, and what we needed to improve on, what maybe I needed him to take a bigger role in discipline or whatever the case may be. But we would go to coffee on a quarterly basis and discuss where we were with each daughter. And so, it allowed him, my husband, to be on the same page. It brought him in to parenting in a very tangible way for us to be united in how we parented so that we could work and reinforce things together. And then as the girls got older, this continued. And so, the meetings, so to speak, if you want to call them that, may look a little bit different. But the baseline had been set on how we parented, how we structured and how we were working towards the same goal. So, you can start that early when they're young, but it allows you an opportunity to know where you're wanting to end up so that when graduation day comes, we can look and say, “You know what? We accomplished our goals.”

Jo Wilbur:
So, the number-one tip is being intentional and from early on, so that at the end you're not saying, “Wait, what was my goal again? And how can we have them leave and do all these things when it's almost too late?”

Chimene Dupler:
So that you can actually sit at graduation and enjoy it.

Jo Wilbur:
Yeah, yeah, exactly. So, I love that partnership with your husband. And I do want to ask you more about that. Now that you and your husband are at that point where you're getting ready to be empty nesters, your youngest is a junior now, so it won't be long. So, do you have tips for maybe other people who are in that same stage of life who are wondering, “How can I get ready to be an empty nester? It's going to be weird when my kids are gone, you know, it's one thing to get your girls ready to leave the house, but how do you get yourself ready for them to leave the house?”

Chimene Dupler:
Yeah, a couple of things. One specifically is, invest in your marriage. Do not let your children usurp the relationship that you and your husband have together. And I think we do a disservice to our children when we put a greater priority on our kids than our marriage. Practically speaking, this is called a child-centered home as opposed to a parent-centered home. And so, when we have a child-centered home, that means everything revolves around the kids. Right? And again, we were extremely intentional from day one to not have a child-centered home. We had a parent-centered home, or better yet, a Christ-centered home, which God calls us to focus on our marriages first before our kids. And it gives the kids not only security, it also gives them, when you're talking about discipline, they know that you're on the same page. They cannot play one parent against the other. You are a united force. But it also, in addition to that security, I believe it also provides a spirit of joy for the children. It provides a spirit of unity. It provides safety, but it also gives the gift that your kids are looking to you to model the image of Christ. And again, we talked about how we are the bride of Christ as believers. And marriage is a beautiful example. The Bible talks about this. Marriage is a picture of Christ in the church. And as being the picture of Christ in the church, we should be modeling for our kids what that looks like. And so, marriage is a beautiful opportunity to teach our children about grace. It's a beautiful opportunity to teach our children about forgiveness. It's a beautiful opportunity to teach our children how to walk through tough trials and to depend upon the Lord and to not walk away from our covenant relationships and marriage, but to be drawn closer to that covenant relationship. Marriage is a covenant. And again, culturally speaking, we, as a society, do not value the covenant of marriage. But when we look at marriage from a biblical worldview, marriage is a covenant, and it is to be a picture of Christ and the church. And when we are not protecting that covenant, one of the greatest ways that Satan gets a foothold, not only in our family but in culture, is he destroys the family. And when we let Satan have a foothold in our family and he destroys the family, he can take out the kids. And Satan loves nothing more than to come in and destroy the one picture that God created as a picture to be a picture of Christ and the church, to be a picture of that bride of Christ. And so, Satan knows what he's doing when he destroys the family. He is trying to destroy that picture that God has set up and established as a picture of that covenant relationship of His love for us, Christ's love for us. And so, again, when we invest in our marriages and we bring our kids into the struggles, it gives us an opportunity again to point our children to Jesus and for them to see their need for Christ.

Jo Wilbur:
Which is that end goal that you talked about in the beginning. That's the goal.

Chimene Dupler:
Absolutely. Everything is intentional.

Jo Wilbur:
Well, I love that so much, that the marriage ultimately is such a huge part of parenting. And, you know, you talk about investing in that relationship, investing in your marriage. As someone myself who has only been married three and a half years (I hope that's correct), what I would love to know, like, what are some good ways to invest in your marriage? What do you mean when you say that? What's the key to a good marriage? The people want to know.

Chimene Dupler:
Well, and I think I got on a little bit of a tangent, because I think in your last question, you're asking about how to transition to empty nesters. So that kind of goes a little bit hand-in-hand with what you're asking.

Jo Wilbur:  
Yes, it does!

Chimene Dupler:
I apologize. We need to realize that when our kids leave, we're not looking at a stranger. And so, one day your kids are going to leave, which is the goal, right? And so, we want our we want to raise up independent, healthy, young adults that can go out into the world and be successful. As they launch them, we need to not look on the other side of the room and say, and “Who are you?” And not be miserable in our marriages. And so, we have to be intentional to invest in our marriages so that we're excited about that next season. I'm excited! Now, you know, you could get me easily crying about, you know, the fact that all the girls are going to be out of the house. And there's nothing I love more than being a mom. And so, while the season is a bittersweet season, I'm successful in that I've done what I've set out to do. I feel like that I've been intentional in what God has entrusted me with, to raise them up to go out into the world and to be world changers. And so, whenever I look at that season coming to an end, it also is with great excitement that I am married to my best friend. We're about to celebrate 25 years of marriage. And you know, there's no one I would rather do life with. And so, whether you're going through hard times or great times, again, looking at that relationship as a covenant relationship of what a beautiful, joyful opportunity that God has given us this partnership and an opportunity to spend life with someone you love. And one of the things that we've tried to do, not only, you know, date nights are important, especially when your kids are young, making sure that you're making time when your children are young, to set aside time for your husband, putting your children to bed at a decent bedtime routine when they're young, and then having your evenings with your husband. As your kids get older, going on, you know, if you can get away for the weekend or doing things that you are investing in that relationship with your husband so that you can be a better mom. I mean, you can be… you can do your job so much better when you're actually investing in your marriage. One of the practical things that, even as our kids have launched, which our kids have gone out of state to school and so it was a longer drop off process because it wasn't, you know, a couple of hours down the road. And so, we made the journey for drop off a blast. Can I just tell you? And so, being able to set aside a couple days to have that one daughter one on one with my husband and myself, spend two or three days intentionally just investing in her before the drop off that by the time we dropped her off, then we were intentional to have a couple of days just for us before we returned home to the other children. And so, being very thoughtful about how you do even your drop off for college of making it fun and making it fun for you and your spouse together, as well as the process of dropping your child off to college.

Jo Wilbur:
Because like you said, you've done your job. And so, there's peace with that. And now you can celebrate together. I love that so much. So, I'm thinking about all the parents that might be listening to this. And is there one most important thing that you would love for them to leave this episode knowing maybe about parenting or a word of encouragement for parents who might feel discouraged or overwhelmed?

Chimene Dupler:
Keep your eyes on Jesus. And I think that whenever I say that, I'm not trying to be trite, but our world has a lot of distractions. Social media has a lot of distractions. And with those distractions, we can live in a world of fear, and fear is not of God. Fear breeds insecurity, insecurity breeds comparison, and comparison takes our eyes off of Jesus. And so, it's easy for us to look at what other families do. It's easy for us to look at what appears to be success in other families instead of kind of putting our head down and staying in our lane. And when we keep our eyes on Jesus and we do that tag team of parenting with the Holy Spirit, when we're intentional and investing in our marriages, then we truly have the opportunity of discipleship in the home. We have the opportunity to be salt and light in our home so that then when we leave the home, then we are going out and proclaiming the Gospel. We are fulfilling the Great Commission. And so, as we keep our eyes on Jesus, it allows us to keep our perspective on Him and knowing what the ultimate goal is. And ultimately, we need to be parenting through the perspective of eternity, and eternity lasts forever, and eternity is what matters. And so, when we open our eyes and start to see our relationships, our parenting, our marriages, our culture from an eternal perspective, it will shift how we see the world. It'll shift how we do parenting. As we spend time individually with the Lord and as I'm intentional to be in his Word, to be led by the Holy Spirit, it allows us to navigate the struggles and trials in life. But God is a God of hope. God is a God of redemption. God is a God of grace. And so, for those who may be listening, who have that sophomore, junior, senior, and feel like, “Man, I wish I could go back and do it again.” God's not a God of regrets. And I know that personally. A lot of times I can get stuck on beating myself up, on wishing I could have handled something different, wishing I wouldn't have said something, wishing I would have been a better mom in a certain situation, wishing I would have been what my kids needed in that moment. But you know what? Today is a new day, and God's grace and his mercies are new every morning. His grace is sufficient. And so, when we look at, you know what, I can either live in regret and be looking in the rearview mirror, or I can ask God for grace and wisdom today, and I can make today amazing. And so, starting with a clean slate. I'll end with this last analogy. When our girls were really little and we would have to discipline them, we would always pray with them. At the end, after we had told them, you know, why we were disappointed in them, what the consequence was, and so forth. And after we would pray and ask Jesus to forgive them and they would repent and ask for forgiveness, we would always say, "Clean slate." So, we have a fresh start. We have a God who loves us. We have a God who redeems, and we have a God who can redeem the past. And ultimately, it's the Holy Spirit's job to draw our children unto him. We are just the vessels that have been blessed with this holy calling and this high calling with the gifts that he's given us. But ultimately, the Holy Spirit is the one who calls us unto himself.

Jo Wilbur:
I love that– clean slate. What a beautiful way to model grace. It's something I should say to myself, even. Maybe every morning. “Clean slate today.” So, Chimene, as a mom, when you look around at society and the world and the negative influences that are impacting today's kids, how do you not get discouraged and overwhelmed as a parent?

Chimene Dupler:
Yeah. Well, I think that when we recognize that we are called by God and that our lives are not an accident, none of this is taking God by surprise. You think about Esther, and “for such a time as this,” and you know, it's for such a time as this that you and I are living. It is for such a time as this that our children are in the world and are the ages that they are. So, none of this takes God by surprise. We may be discouraged in what we see in culture, but we do not have to live in fear. “God does not give us a spirit of fear, but of power and might and a sound mind.” And so, when we keep our eyes on him and we understand that our authority comes from him, we have that vertical focus versus a horizontal focus. And so, a few minutes ago, I referenced about how fear breeds insecurity. Insecurity breeds comparison. Comparison takes our eyes off of Jesus. So, we have to keep that vertical mindset instead of looking horizontally to the world around us and just remembering that God is in control. He sits on the throne. And so, for such a time as this, that we are raising up a Godly generation and again, looking at parenting as an opportunity to raise world changers. You know, one of the things that I believe that moms have the greatest opportunity of impact is impacting culture. We literally are raising the next generation. And so, if you want to look at moms as being the most powerful platform in society, we are literally shaping and molding the next generation. So, what are we doing with that opportunity? And that's where we look and say we're going to stand before God and give an account because we have the opportunity to impact the next generation more than anyone else in society. Mothers… mothers have the opportunity to impact the next generation. So, looking at mothering as raising world changers. We Have the opportunity to raise a generation of world changers. So, looking at that discipleship opportunity and fulfilling the Great Commission of going out and making him known because we were created to know God and to make him known. And finally, I would just say, are we defining culture, or is culture defining us?

Jo Wilbur:
Yeah. Well, I love that. Motherhood, such a powerful role and with great power comes great responsibility.

Chimene Dupler:
Absolutely.

Jo Wilbur:
Absolutely. Where can people find a copy of your book for even more of this great wisdom and knowledge that you're offering?

Chimene Dupler:
Yes. “The High Calling of Motherhood” is available at Amazon. So, Amazon.

Jo Wilbur:
Easy.

Chimene Dupler:
All right, easy.

Jo Wilbur:
I'm getting my copy today. And then can you give us a little sneak peek maybe about what your next upcoming book might be about?

Chimene Dupler:
Yes, the next book that I am working on right now, the working title is “Suit Up.” Looking at Ephesians six and putting on the full armor of God.

Jo Wilbur:
Oh, I love that.

Chimene Dupler:
Yeah. And looking at how we see society, how we raise a family from the idea of putting on the spiritual armor of God. And so, how we are understanding who and whose we are in Christ. And so, the authority that we have in Christ as sons and daughters of the King. And so, walking in that authority, again, not being afraid by culture, but walking in the authority that we have as sons and daughters of the king, putting on that full armor of God and looking at the world from a spiritual worldview, from a biblical worldview.

Jo Wilbur:
I love that, sign me up. Get me on the preorder list. I'm excited to read. Thank you so much, Chimene, for joining us today. It has been a real pleasure.

Chimene Dupler:
Thank you. Thanks so much for having me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out our blog!

How to Protect Ourselves and Our Families Online (Pt. 3): Protection from Programs

...the vast majority of intrusions will be attempted by automated processes, set up to repeatedly bombard recipients with alerts and emails until that fateful day our common sense fails, and we give away our personal information. This can occur in several ways, and it will be my goal today to share with you the most common occurrences and tools at your disposal to protect against them.

Read More about How to Protect Ourselves and Our Families Online (Pt. 3): Protection from Programs